Day: September 24, 2021

Full-Fitting of Ocular Prosthetics

ocular prosthetics

An ocular prosthetic artificial eye, glasses lens, or plastic eye is a kind of cranial prosthetic that substitutes a missing eye after an ocular resection, removal, or other orbital exteriors, such as a receding angle of entry (RAO) or other deformation of the cranium. The artificial eye, eyewear, or other prostheses are fitted over the eyes and below the choroid. A variety of materials are used in manufacturing these prosthetic devices, including surgical mesh, carbon fiber, sponges, and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Implant options depend on factors such as the patient’s ophthalmic history, ocular anatomy, the degree of facial deformation at the time of surgery, the degree of ptosis, the degree of contracture, and any other factors that are specific to individual patients. Besides the prosthetic device itself, ocular prosthetic surgery also involves the repair of sutures or the application of eye-wear. All these procedures are normally outpatient, with minimal postoperative imaging required.

How To Improve At Full-fitting Of Ocular Prosthetics

The conventional method of fitting an artificial eye, glasses lens, or plastic eye is the use of a glazing technique. In this method, the iris is pre-manufactured with a thin layer of metallic compound, which is used to form the socket for the fitting process. A conjunctival cushioning agent is then injected into the socket for additional stability. The entire procedure may take approximately one to two hours in-office visits.

The benefits of using ocular prosthetics, or fully-fitted, non-surgical replacements, include the following: the ability to see clearly without the use of glasses or contacts, the ability to perform delicate tasks without the need for specialized equipment, the ability to see near objects without the assistance of a hand, the ability to perform daily activities without the need to remove one’s eyewear, and finally, the ability to enjoy the freedom of choosing one’s own cosmetic look. The use of corrective prostheses has helped millions around the globe to enjoy these freedoms. For this reason, it is important for an ophthalmologist to become board certified in order to prescribe, counsel and inspect the fitting process. Board certification is especially important for secularists that have performed other medical prosthodontics and for those that have additional training in cosmetic procedures, such as the application of conjunctival coatings or the fitting of artificial eyes.

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